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Discipleship

The Great Journey

The Great Journey Towards...

  • Quieting the inner turmoil of compulsive thoughts, emotions, and impulses that typically drive our lives.
  • Guiding us to the discovery of who we really are and who we are called to be as unique spiritual persons.
  • Facilitating the incarnation of that discovery in the reality of our day to day lives.
  • Contemplative Service on Wednesdays at 6:20 PM in the New Horizon's SS Room. Learn the practices of centering prayer, reading/teaching, meditation, prayer, contemplation and action and how to make them become part of your daily practice.

    Core concepts of the great journey

    Conversion of Heart is central to the spiritual life. Spirituality that does not actually transform the way we experience and live our active lives is not enough.

    Affirming foundational spiritual imperatives that cut across traditions but which must be implemented uniquely.

    Our intellectual ability to think, analyze, reason, reflect, and understand is an integral part of what it means to be human. Personal experience grounds our intellect in the reality of our day-to-day lives.

    Accepting the profound mysterious nature of much of this great universe, the human epiphany of which each of us is a unique part, and the Divine Presence we call God, calls us to move beyond both our intellect and our personal experience, and to be open to the experience and understanding and guidance that comes from this Mystery.

    The Great Journey affirms faith that emerges from a trust and knowing that comes from a merging of the intellect, experience, and Mystery.

    The Great Journey affirms both religious and secular traditions that guide us toward personal responsibility.

    Divine Union is the ultimate goal of the spiritual life, yet that union must always lead us back to the real world of people, events, and things. The journey toward that Divine Union is a lifelong process, and we can only approximate its reality, but to deny that Divine Union as our deepest and most profound longing is to settle for something less than our possibility.